Ophthalmology Associates of York, LLP 1945 Queenswood Dr. York, PA, 17403 Phone: (717) 846-6900 Fax: (717) 854-9728
Ophthalmology Associates of York, LLP1945 Queenswood Dr. York, PA, 17403Phone: (717) 846-6900Fax: (717) 854-9728    

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the retina — the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly.

  • The macula makes up only a small part of the retina, yet it is much more sensitive to detail than the rest of the retina (called the peripheral retina). The macula is what allows you to thread a needle, read small print, and read street signs. The peripheral retina gives you side (or peripheral) vision. If someone is standing off to one side of your vision, your peripheral retina helps you know that person is there by allowing you to see their general shape.
  • Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. There are different kinds of macular problems, but the most common is age-related macular degeneration.
  • With macular degeneration, you may have symptoms such as blurriness, dark areas or distortion in your central vision, and perhaps permanent loss of your central vision. It usually does not affect your side, or peripheral vision. For example, with advanced macular degeneration, you could see the outline of a clock, yet may not be able to see the hands of the clock to tell what time it is.
  • Causes include the formation of deposits called drusen under the retina, and in some cases, the growth of abnormal blood vessels under the retina. With or without treatment, macular degeneration alone almost never causes total blindness. People with more advanced cases of macular degeneration continue to have useful vision using their side, or peripheral vision. In many cases, macular degeneration's impact on your vision can be minimal.
  • When macular degeneration does lead to loss of vision, it usually begins in just one eye, though it may affect the other eye later.
  • Many people are not aware that they have macular degeneration until they have a noticeable vision problem or until it is detected during an eye examination.
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